Echoes of a Northern Sky

Echoes of a Northern Sky  Jeanette Wrate and the Northern Lights Ensemble

Jeanette Wrate and the Northern Lights Ensemble blend the melodies, rhythms and sounds of Finnish folk music with the swing and improvisation of contemporary jazz to create a unique and original music. This innovative group, led by jazz drummer Jeanette Wrate (Dizzy Gillespie, Maiden Voyage and Big World), includes violinist Jeff Gauthier, double bassist Anders Swanson, and keyboard player Craig Ochikubo.

Members

Jeanette Wrate
Drums
Craig Ochikubo
Anders Swanson
Drums
George McMullen

Tracks

1Entelli9:06
2Sofia's Flykt7:31
3The Shadow of My Tango6:43
4Kalmari Special4:02
5Sade4:53
6Didjeridu and Percussion Interlude2:16
7Kantele5:23
8Voice, Gong, and Kantele Interlude3:06
9Lahtovirsi (Departing Song)2:34
10Horpsis6:54
11Laitisen Mankeliska (Heikki's Mangle Dance)9:57
12Evening Prayer7:15

Reviews

The title of the Jeanette Wrate Northern Lights Ensemble’s Echoes of a Northern Sky refers to the drummer’s search for her Scandinavian roots. Brilliant compositions and exquisite sound quality allow all the members of the ensemble to shine. Extended so

David Licht, Modern Drummer, 01/07/1999

Jeanette Wrate is a percussionist of Scandinavian ancestry who has performed with artists like Dizzy Gillespie, Charlie Haden and Jimmy Witherspoon. On her new recording, 'Echoes Of A Northern Sky,' Wrate combines the traditional music of Northern Europe

Jazzonline.com, 01/02/2000

Ms. Wrate is an exceptional drummer. She performs at least one marvel on each track: a simple but effective press roll and hi-hat diminution, judicious and funny cowbell accents, arch polyrhythms etc.

Jazz Times,

Wrate, who is a triple threat on voice, drums and just about everything percussive from marimba to cowbell...is a whirling dervish of rhythmic coloration. Her responsive stroking is a source of constant inventiveness.”

Michael Rosenstein, Cadence Magazine, 01/07/1999

She makes foreign dance motifs swing in a way that’s natural yet challenging to American ears, translating a seemingly esoteric folk style into the language of fin de siècle improvisation based music without sacrificing the vivaciousness of the prototype.

Kirk Silsbee, New Times LA, 01/07/1999